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Presentation Degree Project ASBM01 Master in Sustainable Urban Design 17-18 September

 

The degree project presentation is a public event but due to the current situation and by following the recommendation from the university there will be no presentation in the A-building!

 

If you would like to take part in the presentation you have to register for the ZOOM meeting by e-mail.

In the mail you state your name, what day and presentation you would like to see. In return you will get a link to the ZOOM meeting that day. 

The mail should be sent to Filip.Lidegran@abm.lth.se (weekdays 8-17). 

 

  

Thursday 17/9

9:00‐10:30

David Einarsson

Urban foodprint – exploring a design merging urban landscape and local food production

PS/LL

JE/PJD

10:30‐12.00

Cibele Guimarães

Jokkmokk: The Arctic future ‐ Climate transitions and Urban design Challenges in the

Arctic

PS/LL

JE/PJD

LUNCH

 

 

 

 

13:00‐14:30

Wrishitesh Sarkar

Towards An Interactive Winter City ‐ New

Directions for Kiruna

LL/MM

JE/PJD

14:30‐16:00

Vera Wetzels

InVíkorate

Exploring self‐sufficiency in a tourist‐dependent Icelandic village

LL/MM

JE/PJD

16.00‐17:30

Kritika Singhal

Making Room!

Exploring the possibilities of Housing densification within the city of Berlin

PS/AO

JE/PJD

Friday 18/9

9:00‐10:30

Marcio Thomasi Da Silva

PIAZZA GRANDE

Designing Public Spaces that can connect, integrate, and promote social equity

LL/JE

CHM/LHS

10:30‐12.00

Sara Ebrahimi

Activating Amiralsgatan through Urban

Regeneration

PS/AO

CHM/LHS

Lunch

 

 

 

 

13:00‐14:30

Jaisudha Nandakumar

Third spaces for children

JM/IS

CHM/DW

14:30‐16:00

Annete Priyadarshini

Freeing gendered spaces – From social inclusion

to production

PS/AO

CHM/DW

16.00‐17:30

Axel Hansson

The coastal city of Malmö ‐ A blue urbanism approach

PS/AO

CHM/DW

 

 

 

Examiner/Supervisors

PS

Peter Siöström

LL

Louise Lövenstierne

AO

Andreas Olsson

JE

Jonna Ekholm

IS

Ida Sandström

JM

Jesper Magnusson

JE

Jonna Ekholm

MM

Misagh Mottaghi

 

 

 

Jury

JE

Jonna Ekholm

PJD

Per‐Johan Dahl

CHM

Camilla H Möller

LHS

Lars‐Henrik Ståhl

 DW

Daniel Wasden

 

 

Sara Ebrahimi 

 

Stad med människor. Illustration.

 

 

Activating Amiralsgatan through Urban Regeneration:

Urban regeneration is a program of land redevelopment often used to address urban decay in cities to clear out ‘the old and unused’ and create opportunities for higher class housing, businesses, social activities and more.

 

The site for this program is located in Malmö, Rosengård, on the Amiralsgatan highway. The Rosengård district is considered a vulnerable area, with low in-come residents living there. Moreover, it is very segregated from the rest of the city of Malmö.


The concept project is divided into phases, concentrating on activating the highway with several types of activities along the way with addition to different type of housing. These activities and housing will make Rosengård a thriving place to be in, additionally will attract people to visit the district and will encourage new people to move in to the area, thus creating social integration and at the same making it a safe area to live in.

 

David Einarson

 

 Bebyggelse. Illustration.  

 

Urban foodprint – exploring a design merging urban landscape and local food production

Globally we are facing alarming issues regarding the current food consumption, food that requires more space, water and transportation get more common. Dealing with this, the project is developed on the idea of merging urban design and agriculture to embrace locally produced food and self-sufficient societies.

The site is located in Refshaleøen, Copenhagen, that during recent years has been transformed into a zone for creative minds with food tourism as the central activity. Annually the peninsula states the largest street food market in the Nordic region.

While adapting concepts of food production in the urban design the project tries to embrace the local food culture. Questions discussed are, how can soil quality be improved to maximize productivity? How can we shape the architecture to enable a self-sufficient lifestyle? And what spatial qualities does this bring to the public realm?

 

Cibele Guimaraes

 

 

Jokkmokk: The Arctic future - Climate transitions and Urban design Challenges in the Arctic

 

Polar nights and midnight sun, extreme cold and snow are part of the identity of Arctic cities. These conditions set a demand on urban designers to find solutions to make the city more livable and attractive during the long dark days in the winter and enjoyable during long bright days in the short summers.  My interests in different types of landscape and climate lead me to the northernmost city in Sweden, Jokkmokk.

In Jokkmokk lies a strong tie with the Sami Heritage and possesses an astonishing natural landscape.  However, the city dynamics is threatened by shrinking population, mining companies and climate change. This thesis aims to use the winter as a design driving force to transform Jokkmokk in a city more attractive to live and addresses suggestions on how to increase the economy, focusing on local production and as well strategies to build up a place resilient for the upcoming challenges.

 

Axel Hansson

 

 

 

The coastal city of Malmö - A blue urbanism approach

Due to climate change, the average global sea level is rising. Consequently, flood protection is being discussed by cities all over the world. Out of all the proposed solutions for this, those that can offer something beyond the construction of high walls are the ones with most benefits. We should create coastal protections that offers added value, for us humans as well as for the ecosystem we live in.

Malmö’s coastline has been shaped by the city’s historical development. The Industrial era is the main influence and used large landfills to create the barren and technical industrial landscape that we still see in some parts of the coastline today.

This thesis project proposes a new approach to landfills based on the needs of the city and nature today. By using the landscape that already exists we can create the future we want in our cities. With Ön in Malmö as an example, I want to show how natural values, both on and offshore, can be combined with the city’s need for growth and development, and together add new values to the coastline. Establishing a coastal protection is time-consuming and costly and must be implemented gradually. Following the city’s aim to develop as a coastal city, thoughtful urban design can connect land and water in a way that brings citizens closer to the sea and highlights the ocean as an integrated part of the urban environment. To restore ocean habitat and at the same time offer a window to the marine world, a “blue urbanism” approach is key to this project. 

 

 

Jaisudha Nanda Kumar 

 

 

 

Third spaces for children

This thesis is a study of the public social life of children in an urban environment and of implementation of techniques and tools that would transform a typically large metropolitan city into a child friendly city. The common conception of children as the future citizen rather than as active citizens have led to completely ignoring the needs of children during the designing process in many cities. If a child is brought up in an nurturing environment there could be a positive impact on the child’s behavior, character  and physical  well being as they grow older.

 

The lack of concern for considering children as active citizens at a  city planning level is seen in many countries but in this thesis Bangalore has been chosen as a test bed to study the following questions: Do children in a fast growing cities have a third place within their daily commute? How can the streets that connect such different spaces be a safe route for the children to use? What are the principles that are to be used to make the streets or spaces child friendly if not how can such spaces be made?

 

Annete Priydarshini 

---

 

 

Freeing gendered spaces – From social inclusion to production

 

Student: Annete Priyadarshini

Site: Malmo, Sweden

Supervisor: Andreas Olsson

Examiner: Peter Sjöström

 

Urbanisation and migration in the last decades, has resulted in more pronounced socio-economic inequalities and segregation within cities all over the world. In this new world, the marginalised and vulnerable sections of the society face the stark inadequacies of our already gendered and production centric cities the most. The values of this city often fail to accommodate women balancing caregiving and productive roles.

This project aims to explore an imaginary of the 'Gender-inclusive city', leading to social and economic sustainability. It stems from the standpoint of radical equality, where the right to space is a given and therefore, so is allocation and designing of space for vulnerable groups. Now, more than ever, the need for women to be able to integrate, socialise, form networks, and seek opportunities, has become crucial to the development and well- being of marginalised communities.

 

Inequality is at the heart of the gravest issues facing our society, including development, climate, and peace. Intentional and targeted approaches aimed at including the vulnerable half of our population could be the clue to better cities.

 

Wrishitesh Sarkar

 

 

 

Towards An Interactive Winter City - New Directions for Kiruna

 

Masters Thesis Project by Wrishitesh Sarkar

Supervisor: Misagh Mottaghi

Examiner: Louise Lövenstierne

 

Kiruna, the northernmost city in the sub-arctics of Sweden, is currently witnessing an unprecedented deformation and reformation of the urban form due to the ongoing erosion of the land mass. This has made it necessary to move the city centre around 3 kilometres to the east. Due to the deformation timeline, it has opened up new possibilities of expanding the city further towards the north-east and east with the Tuolluvaara landform as it's core.

There have been questions still prevalent as to how to make the urban realm in winter cities more usable and interactive while maintaining the winter mobility. This project explores this possibility of expansion through a design proposal of the urban environment keeping in mind the sub-arctic conditions and respecting the existing unique landscape of Kiruna. The aim is to understand how site-specific strategies can be implemented to maintain the regional and local connections and to make Kiruna an interactive winter city.

 

Marcio Thomasi Da Silva

 

 

 

 

PIAZZA GRANDE

Designing Public Spaces that can connect, integrate, and promote social equity

Italy became the 5th country in Europe to receive more immigrants. The city of Milan has the highest concentration of newcomers, it represents 19% the city’s population. Although there is not strong social friction or physical segregation between natives and newcomers, social inequity is quite visible in the city.

Therefore, this project aims to create work and educational opportunities to promote an equal lifestyle between newcomers and native-born. Additionally, this project intends to increase social capital and develop a strong and resilient community by creating multiple social opportunities where new citizens and locals feel united.

 

This project investigates the migrant situation in Milan, understands social integration of newcomers, explores the best urban conditions to create multicultural communities and finally it creates both urban design and social strategies.

 

 

Kritika Singhal

 

 

 

Project Title: Making Room!

 

Subtitle: Exploring the possibilities of Housing densification within the city of Berlin.

This project is inspired by my own journey of house hunting in 10 cities across 3 countries in last 10 years and the search continues. These experiences have made me curious to explore the urban dynamics of this never-ending housing demand in cities across the globe.

The thesis examines the parameters associated with rental housing deficiency in Berlin- a city that offers diversity and opportunity at both national and global level. The question raised is, how can it house more talent and yet remains affordable?

 

The research is comprehended with an urban renewal proposal for one of the historic centres in south of Berlin- Tempelhof. It intends to broaden the vision of the existing re-development plans for Neue Mitte Tempelhof. For it to reach its full potential a mixed-use community-based development is proposed that makes room for more liveable spaces in the area.

 

 

Vera Wetzels

 

 

InVíkorate

Exploring self-sufficiency in a tourist-dependent Icelandic village

 

As a country with an economy that relies for over 35% on the tourism industry, Iceland will face many challenges in the future when tourism is expected to decline. The dependency on the influx of international visitors has also with the COVID-19 pandemic proven to be tricky for many Icelanders, especially the ones living in smaller towns and villages that rely even more on tourists passing through. An example of one of those villages is Vík í Myrdal, located on the south coast along a popular tourist route.

 

The dramatic landscape, the iconic church and the rock formations in the Atlantic ocean are just a few of Vík’s highlights. Apart from being mainly tourist-dependent, Vík is nowadays also lacking safe, clear and pleasant pedestrian spaces and a more self-sufficient community that could turn Vík into a resilient, independent and even more enjoyable place to explore and live in.

 

 

 

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